Oyakudon

Oyakudon

Erwin is ISKAndals.com’s regular contributor. A Credit and Financial Analyst in Manila, Erwin migrated to Canada in 2003 and made a drastic career change a year and a half later. With his passion for food and love for cooking, he took a Continuing Education Chef Training Course at George Brown College’s Chef School in Toronto. Don’t miss his other beautiful musings on food.

This beautiful entry was written by Erwin for ISKAndals.com more than a year ago but only published today. I was on a very long hiatus, sorry guys! Pero sabi nga nila, huli man at magaling… huli pa din! I am sharing this for Food Friday and Food Trip Friday. – Iska

H (a) I!

I had several hours to kill before proceeding to my second, and not exactly, pleasant job. It is during this quiet time in the food court that I plan and think what’s next in my totally repetitive and routinary kitchen work life. I kept telling myself that I am doing this to buy stuff for myself, which I had foregone in years and the future. I just had to work my ass out, but that’s an entirely different story. I’m not exactly enthusiastic about doing two jobs, but during this selfish and meaningless period of thought and endless wondering, I discovered a food or dish that I had eaten so much during my university years in Manila.

In the food court was several food choices: Vietnamese, Thai, Chinese, Japanese, Canadian Brunch, Mexican Burritos and definitely, as always, McDonalds. To perk me up a bit, I would buy a cup of coffee and a muffin before going to the grind of this weekly routine of mine, and observe the ‘cooks’ prepare their fast food. From these choices, I was mesmerized by the Japanese Homestyle Food prepared by a Japanese or maybe a Korean family just across from where usually I sat. One of the ladies was blending white loaf into the food processor churning it into fresh breadcrumbs, and maybe, the father was slicing tons chicken breasts into bite size pieces. I observed their mise en place three times a week and was intrigued by it.

At this period, I was also drinking Sake basically to put me down to sleep after a very tiring day of working doubles and thinking when my next day-off would come. From the day’s observance in the food court and from the kick from Sake I drank the night after gave birth to the thought of making Oyakudon.

Yes, fellows, Oyakudon, Gyudon and Tonkatsu were the main food I ate at ‘The Aristocrat’ during my university years; mostly Gyudon though. Initially, Oyakudon for me was a very complex dish, but when I checked out the ingredients on-line and in the bookstore, I realized that it was just basically poaching chicken, onions, and battered eggs over Japanese stock.

Equal Parts: Poaching liquid
Sake
Soy Sauce
Dash of Dashi (diluted in water)
Mirin
Salt/Pepper to taste
Sugar

The Main:
1 Chicken Breast
1 to ½ Slice White Onions
2-3 well beaten eggs
Finely chopped Scallions
Steamed Rice/Japanese Rice

Optional Ingredients: Garnish
Preserved, Pickled Ginger (in bottles)
Sliced Cucumber/ Grated Carrots

In a sauté pan, heat the pan at low to mid until the poaching liquid simmers.

Add the onions and wait until they become aromatic.

Add the chicken slices, turn up the heat a little, and wait until the chicken slices cook; turning them on all sides.

Beat the eggs with scallions and about ¾ of the leftover white onions, and slowly add the beaten eggs into the sauté pan.

Lower the heat, and cover for a few minutes, making sure the eggs and chicken are cooked.

Serve over hot steaming rice.


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5.0 from 1 reviews
Oyakudon
Author: 
Recipe type: Main
 
Ingredients
  • Sake
  • Soy Sauce
  • Dash of Dashi (diluted in water)
  • Mirin
  • Salt/Pepper to taste
  • Sugar
  • 1 Chicken Breast
  • 1 to ½ Slice White Onions
  • 2-3 well beaten eggs
  • Finely chopped Scallions
  • Steamed Rice/Japanese Rice
Instructions
  1. In a sauté pan, heat the pan at low to mid until the poaching liquid (sake, soy sauce, dashi, mirin, salt, pepper, sugar) simmers.
  2. Add the onions and wait until they become aromatic.
  3. Add the chicken slices, turn up the heat a little, and wait until the chicken slices cook; turning them on all sides.
  4. Beat the eggs with scallions and about ¾ of the leftover white onions, and slowly add the beaten eggs into the sauté pan.
  5. Beat the eggs with scallions and about ¾ of the leftover white onions, and slowly add the beaten eggs into the sauté pan.
  6. Lower the heat, and cover for a few minutes, making sure the eggs and chicken are cooked. Serve over hot steaming rice.
Notes
Optional Ingredients: Garnish Preserved, Pickled Ginger (in bottles) Sliced Cucumber/ Grated Carrots

 

 

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14 thoughts on “Oyakudon

  1. love japanese food…and i love katsudon, among three you mentioned! :) thanks for sharing the recipe! btw, how was it? visiting late from FTF, hope to see you around. thanks and have a great week. :)
    cheerful recently posted Greetings…

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